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Panel Sessions

IFAC 2017 World Congress features 8 panel sessions. Contents are provided below.

The IFAC Story
chaired by Stephen Kahne
Tuesday 11 July, 12:15-13:15, St Exupéry
Preparing Tomorrow's Scientists and Engineers for the Challenges of the 21st Century
organized by Bozenna Pasik-Duncan & Frank Doyle
Wednesday 12 July, 10:00-12:00, St Exupéry
History of Automatic Control
chaired by Luc Dugard
Wednesday 12 July, 12:15-13:15, St Exupéry
Your Research Sharing through Outreach
organized by Bozenna Pasik-Duncan
Wednesday 12 July, 13:30-15:30, St Exupéry
How to Enhance Industry/University Collaboration on Advanced Control
chaired by Silvia Mastellone & Alex van Delft
Thursday 13 July, 10:00-12:00, St Exupéry
Automated Vehicles and Safety
organized by MOVEO, chaired by Gérard Yahiaoui
Thursday 13 July, 11:30-13:00, l'Orangerie, Le Manoir du Prince
Control Challenges for Social Systems
chaired by Francoise Lamnabhi-Lagarrigue, C. L. Philip Chen, Wilfrid Perruquetti, Qing-Shan Jia, Sebastián Dormido and Larry Stapleton
Thursday 13 July, 12:15-13:15, Cassiopée St Exupéry
Advanced Control in Industry: The Path Forward
chaired by Tariq Samad and Kazuya Asano
Friday 14 July, 13:30-15:30, St Exupéry

The IFAC Story

Tuesday 11 July, 12:15-13:15, St Exupéry Auditorium

Chairperson: Stephen J. Kahne

Abstract: Four IFAC Past Presidents will make brief remarks followed by a moderated discussion with the audience of topics related to the history of IFAC. IFAC has evolved during the past 60 years into a federation including 69 different countries that have from time to time been part of the IFAC community. In 2017, there are 50 National Member Organizations in IFAC’s General Assembly from all parts of the world. The IFAC Story, soon available on the IFAC web site, describes this evolution, highlights of which will be mentioned in this panel discussion. 

Panel members:

  • Stephen J. Kahne
    14th IFAC President 1993-1996 and IFAC Advisor from 1999
    Stephen Kahne is Professor Emeritus of Engineering at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Prescott, Arizona, USA where he previously held the position of Professor and Chancellor. He was President of the IEEE Control Systems Society, Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control and IEEE Vice-President for Technical Activities. He is a Life Fellow of IEEE, a Fellow of IFAC and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
  • Pedro Albertos Pérez
    16th IFAC President 1999-2002 and IFAC Advisor from 2005
    Pedro Albertos is Emeritus Professor in the Systems Engineering and Control Department of the Universidad Politécnica de Valencia (UPV) in Spain. He is Editor-in-Chief of the Spanish journal RIAI.  He was elected IFAC Fellow in 2006 and is a Life Senior Member of the IEEE. He is an Honorary Professor at the North-Eastern University, Shenyang, China and holds honorary doctorates from the Universities of Oulu (Finland) and the Polytechnic of Bucharest (Romania).
  • Vladimír Kučera
    17th IFAC President 2002-2005 and IFAC Advisor from 2008
    Vladimír Kučera is a Distinguished Researcher and Vice-Director of the Czech Institute of Informatics, Robotics, and Cybernetics. He is an Honorary Professor at the Northeastern University, Shenyang, China (1996) and received honorary doctorates from the Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (2003) and the Université Henri Poincaré, Nancy (2005). He is a founding member and Fellow of the Engineering Academy of the Czech Republic, a Fellow of IEEE (1996) and an IFAC Fellow (2007).
  • Wook H. Kwon
    18th IFAC President 2005-2008 and IFAC Advisor from 2011
    Wook Hyun Kwon is Professor Emeritus at the Seoul National University. He is a Fellow of the National Academy of Engineering of Korea (NAEK), a Fellow of the Korean Academy of Sciences and Technology (KAST), a Life Fellow of the IEEE, a Fellow of TWAS, and a Fellow of IFAC. He was Vice-President of NAEK and KAST. His personal donation of 500,000 USD was instrumental in the creation of the IFAC Foundation.

 


Preparing Tomorrow's Scientists and Engineers for the Challenges of the 21st Century

Wednesday 12 July, 10:00-12:00, St Exupéry Auditorium

Organizers: Bozenna Pasik-Duncan & Frank Doyle
Chairpersons: Bozenna Pasik-Duncan & Linda Bushnell

Abstract: This Panel Session on Education will focus on multiple challenges and opportunities that are presented to young investigators preparing for careers in science and engineering and will address important control engineering education issues of balancing math, science and technology in engineering education. The main questions to be addressed are: How do we integrate research and education? What we, scientists and educators, should do about cultivating student interest in science, math and engineering? Is it important for control engineering students to know math and science? Should control engineering education focus mostly on engineering? What kind of control engineering textbooks are popular among students? Do they need textbooks? Should engineering education focus mostly on technology?

Agenda:

  • Introductions
  • Position statements from panelists
  • Moderated discussion of panelists with the audience
  • Closing remarks
  • EECI PhD Award

Panel members:

  • Bozenna Pasik-Duncan received the Master's degree in Mathematics from the University of Warsaw in 1970, and the Ph.D. and D.Sc. (Habilitation) degrees from the Warsaw School of Economics in Poland in 1978 and 1986, respectively. At the University of Kansas (KU) she is a Professor of Mathematics, Courtesy Professor of both EECS & AE, and ITTC Investigator, Chancellors Club Teaching Professor, and  member of the KU Women's Hall of Fame. She is a Fellow of IEEE, Fellow of IFAC, recipient of the IEEE Third Millennium Medal, and IEEE CSS Distinguished Member Award. She has served in many capacities in several societies including IEEE CSS Vice President, three term IEEE CSS BoG member, and two term Program Director of SIAM Activity Group on Systems Theory and Control. Her current service includes Deputy Chair of the CSS TC on Control Education, Chair of the AACC Education Committee, a member of the IFAC TB as the Education Liaison, Chair of IEEE WIE Committee, a member of the IEEE CSS BoG and SSIT BoG, and a member of the SIAM Activity Group on Systems Theory and Control Conference Steering Committee. She is founder of Women in Control (WIC) and  first chair of IEEE CSS Standing Committee on WIC. At KU she is founder and faculty advisor of student chapters of AWM and SIAM, founder and coordinator of the Outreach Program, and founder and chair of Stochastic Adaptive Control Seminar. Her research interests are primarily in stochastic systems & stochastic adaptive control and in STEM education. She is a recipient of many awards.
  • Linda Bushnell is a Research Associate Professor in the Electrical Engineering Department of the University of Washington. She received her Ph.D. in EE from UC Berkeley in 1994, her M.A. in Mathematics from UC Berkeley in 1989, her M.S. in EE from UConn (Storrs, CT) in 1987, and her B.S. in EE from UConn (Storrs, CT) in 1985. She also received her MBA from the University of Washington Foster School of Business in 2010. Her research interests include networked control systems and secure-control. She is a recipient of the US Army Superior Civilian Service Award, NSF ADVANCE Fellowship, and IEEE Control Systems Society (CSS) Recognition Award. She is a Fellow of the IEEE. She is a member of IEEE, IEEE CSS and IEEE WIE. For IEEE CSS, she has served in many capacities including as a member of the Board of Governors (BoG), Distinguished Lecturer, Chair of Women in Control Standing Committee, member of TC Control Education, Liaison to IEEE WIE, CSS Secretary-Administrator and member of the Executive Committee, and member of BoG. For the American Automatic Control Council (AACC), she is the Treasurer of AACC and a member of the TC on Control Education. She has served ACC in several other capacities as a chair or vice-chair. For the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), she was the General Co-Chair for the Technical Program, Co-Chair for the Conference on High Confidence Networked Systems (HiCoNS) at CPSWeek 2014 and Technical Program Co-Chair for HiCoNS at CPSWeek 2013. She has been a member of multiple Technical Program Committees for the CDC, ACC, HiCoNS, and ISIC conferences.
  • John S. Baras is with the University of Maryland where he holds Lockheed Martin Chair in Systems Engineering the He received the Diploma in Electrical and Mechanical Engineering from the National Technical University of Athens, Greece, 1970; the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Applied Mathematics from Harvard University 1971, 1973. Since 1973, he has been a faculty member in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, and in the Applied Mathematics, Statistics and Scientific Computation Program, at the University of Maryland College Park. Since 2000, faculty member in the Fischell Department of Bioengineering. Since 2014, faculty member in the Mechanical Engineering Department. Founding Director of the Institute for Systems Research (ISR), 1985 to 1991.  Since 1991, Founding Director of the Maryland Center for Hybrid Networks (HYNET). Since 2013, Guest Professor at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden. IEEE Life Fellow, SIAM Fellow, AAAS Fellow, NAI Fellow, IFAC Fellow, and a Foreign Member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences (IVA). Received the 1980 George Axelby Prize from the IEEE Control Systems Society, the 2006 Leonard Abraham Prize from the IEEE Communications Society, the 2014 Tage Erlander Guest Professorship from the Swedish Research Council, and a three year (2014-2017) Senior Hans Fischer Fellowship from the Institute for Advanced Study of the Technical University of Munich, Germany. He was inducted in the A. J. Clark School of Engineering Innovation Hall of Fame (2016) of the University of Maryland and he was selected to receive the 2017 IEEE Simon Ramo Medal, and the 2017 AACC Richard E. Bellman Control Heritage Award. Dr. Baras has coauthored more than 850 technical papers in prestigious refereed journals and conferences, one book (Path Problems in Networks, 2010)), and co-edited three others. He has educated 85 doctoral students, 112 MS students and has mentored 50 postdoctoral fellows. His research interests include systems and control, optimization, communication networks, signal processing and understanding, robotics, computing systems, network security and trust, systems biology, healthcare management systems, model-based systems engineering. He has been awarded eighteen patents and has been honored with many awards as innovator and leader of economic development.
  • Tamer Başar is with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he holds the academic positions of Swanlund Endowed Chair; Center for Advanced Study Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Professor, Coordinated Science Laboratory; Professor, Information Trust Institute; and Affiliate Professor, Mechanical Sciences and Engineering. Since 2014, he also holds the administrative position of Director of the Center for Advanced Study, and prior to that he was the Director of the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology. He received his BSEE degree from Robert College (Istanbul), and MS, MPhil, and Ph.D. degrees from Yale University (New Haven). He is a member of the US National Academy of Engineering (since 2000); Life Fellow of IEEE, Fellow of IFAC, and Fellow of SIAM. He was president of the American Automatic Control Council (2010-11), president of the IEEE Control Systems Society (2000), and the founding president of the International Society of Dynamic Games (1990-94). He has served IFAC in various capacities, most notably as Council member (2011-14), Chair of Publications Committee (2014-17), and Editor-in-Chief of Automatica (2004-14). He has received IFAC’s Outstanding Service Award (2005) and Quazza Medal (2005), and a number of international honorary doctorates and professorships, including chaired professorship at Tsinghua University. He has over 800 publications covering systems, control, communications, optimization, networks, and dynamic games, including books on non-cooperative dynamic game theory, robust control, network security, wireless and communication networks, and stochastic networks. He is editor of several book series.
  • Lucy Pao is a Professor in the Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering Department and a Professor (by courtesy) in the Aerospace Engineering Sciences Department at the University of Colorado Boulder in the USA. During 2016-2017, she has been on sabbatical as a Fellow of the Hanse-Wissenschaftskolleg Institute for Advanced Study in Delmenhorst, Germany and a Visiting Scholar at the ForWind Center for Wind Energy Research at Oldenburg University. She earned B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University. Her research has primarily been in the control systems area, with applications ranging from atomic force microscopy to disk drives to digital tape drives to megawatt wind turbines and wind farms. She is a past recipient of the IFAC Young Author Prize, and she is a Fellow of IFAC and IEEE. Recent paper awards include the 2012 IEEE Control Systems Magazine Outstanding Paper Award (with K. Johnson) and the 2015 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) Journal on Control and Optimization Best Paper Prize (with J. Marden and H. P. Young). Selected current professional society activities include being a Fellow of the Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute (2009-present), IEEE Control Systems Society Fellow Nominations Chair (2016-present), member of the IFAC Fellow Selection Committee (2014-2017), and member of the International Program Committee for the 2017 IFAC World Congress.
  • Christos G. Cassandras is Distinguished Professor of Engineering at Boston University. He is Head of the Division of Systems Engineering, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and co-founder of Boston University’s Center for Information and Systems Engineering(CISE). He received degrees from Yale University (B.S., 1977), Stanford University (M.S.E.E., 1978), and Harvard University (S.M., 1979; Ph.D., 1982). In 1982-84 he was with ITP Boston, Inc. where he worked on the design of automated manufacturing systems. In 1984-1996 he was a faculty member at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Massachusetts/Amherst. He specializes in the areas of discrete event and hybrid systems, cooperative control, stochastic optimization, distributed optimization in network systems, and computer simulation, with applications to computer and sensor networks, manufacturing systems, and transportation systems. He has published about 400 refereed papers in these areas, and six books. He has guest-edited several technical journal issues and serves on several journal Editorial Boards. In addition to his academic activities, he has worked extensively with industrial organizations on various systems integration projects and the development of decision-support software. He has most recently collaborated with The MathWorks, Inc. in the development of the discrete event and hybrid system simulator SimEvents®.  He is a Fellow of the IEEE and a Fellow of the IFAC. Cassandras has served IEEE in several capacities and his career has been recognized with several awards.
  • Dawn M. Tilbury received the B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering, summa cum laude, from the University of Minnesota in 1989, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1992 and 1994, respectively.  In 1995, she joined the faculty of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where she is currently Professor of Mechanical Engineering with a joint appointment in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.  Her research interests lie broadly in the area of control systems, including applications to robotics and manufacturing systems. She has published more than 150 articles in refereed journals and conference proceedings.  She was elected Fellow of the IEEE in 2008 and Fellow of the ASME in 2012, and is a Life Member of SWE.
  • Sebastian Trimpe is a Research Group Leader at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Tübingen, Germany, where he leads the Intelligent Control Systems group. Sebastian obtained his Ph.D. degree in 2013 from ETH Zurich with Raffaello D’Andrea at the Institute for Dynamic Systems and Control. Before, he received a B.Sc. degree in General Engineering Science in 2005, a M.Sc. degree (Dipl.-Ing.) in Electrical Engineering in 2007, and an MBA degree in Technology Management in 2007, all from Hamburg University of Technology. In 2007, he was a research scholar at the University of California at Berkeley. Sebastian’s research interests are in the area of control systems theory and design with emphasis on networked and learning systems. Sebastian is recipient of the triennial IFAC World Congress Interactive Paper Prize (2011) and the Klaus Tschira Award for achievements in public understanding of science (2014).
  • Maria Elena Valcher received the Master Degree (cum laude) in Electronic Engineering  (1991) and the Ph.D. Degree in Systems Engineering (1995) both from the University of Padova (Italy). Since January 2005 she is Full Professor of Control Theory at the University of Padova. She is author/co-author of approximately 80 papers appeared on international journals, 95 conference papers and 15 book chapters. Her research interests include multidimensional systems theory, polynomial matrix theory, behavior theory, Boolean control networks, multi-agent systems and consensus problems, switched systems and positive systems. She served on several Editorial Boards including for IEEE and SIAM. She held various positions within the IEEE Control Systems Society: Appointed BoG Member (2003); Elected BoG Member (2004-2006; 2010-2012); Vice President Member Activities (2006-2007); Vice President Conference Activities (2008-2010); President-Elect (2014); President (2015); Junior Past President (2016). She was involved in the organization of several conferences, in particular she was registration Chair of the 2004 IEEE CDC, Publicity Chair of the 2007 MSC, Registration Chair of the 2011 IFAC World Conference and Program Chair of the 2012 IEEE CDC. She was a member of the 2013, 2014 and 2015 IEEE Control Systems Award committee, a member of the 2016 IEEE Fellow Committee, and of the 2016 IEEE TAB Ad Hoc Committee on Women and Under-Represented Groups. She was a Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE CSS (2011-2014). She received the 2011 IEEE CSS Distinguished Member Award and she is an IEEE Fellow since 2012. She is currently a member of the 2017 IEEE Tab Committee On Diversity And Inclusion. She was in the 2014-2017 Awards Committees for two IFAC Journals: Automatica and NAHS. She is a member of the IFAC Technical Board (2017-2020).
  • Iven Mareels obtained the (ir) Masters of Electromechanical Engineering from Gent University Belgium in 1982 and the PhD in Systems Engineering from the Australian National University, Canberra, Australia in 1987. Since 1996, he is a Professor of Electrical and Electronic Engineering in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Melbourne. In June 2007, he became Dean of the Melbourne School of Engineering. He has extensive experience in consulting for both industry and government. He has strong interests in education. He was one of the developers of the Bachelor of Engineering at the Australian National University and one of the architects of the new 3+2 Master of Engineering education at Melbourne. His research interests are in large scale systems, which he studies using techniques from nonlinear control theory and dynamical systems theory, as well as adaptive and learning control methods. At present his research is focused on the modelling and control of water distribution systems, the electrical grid and the brain (in particular the epileptic brain). Mareels has published widely, one general book about systems engineering, four research monographs, in excess of 130 journal publications and 250 conference publications. He is also co-inventor of a family of 23 international patents related to autonomous water distribution systems. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering, Australia, a Fellow of the IEEE (USA), a Fellow of the Institute of Engineers Australia, and a Foreign Fellow of the Royal Flemish Academy of Belgium for Science and the Arts.  He has received numerous awards for his research and teaching. In 2013 Mareels, was named a Commander in the Order of the Crown of Belgium and he received the Centenary Medal.
  • Francoise Lamnabhi-Lagarrigue, IFAC Fellow, is CNRS Senior Researcher since 1993 at the Laboratory of Signal and Systems, a Research Unit placed under the joint responsibility of CNRS, CentraleSupelec, University Paris-Sud and University Paris Saclay, France. She obtained the Master of Mathematics degree at the University Paul Sabatier (Toulouse) in 1976 and she held a CNRS researcher position in 1980. She received her Ph.D. and Docteur d'Etat degrees from the University Paris Sud in 1980 and 1985, respectively. Since 2001 she is Senior Editor of International Journal of Control and since 2015, Editor-in-Chief of Annual Reviews in Control. She was Scientific Manager of the European Marie Curie Control Training Site (2002-2006), of the European Network of Excellences HYCON (2005-2009) and HYCON2 (2010-2014). She is the founder of the European Embedded Control Institute (EECI) and the chair of the EECI International Graduate School on Control. Since 2011, she is serving as Member of the IFAC Technical Board as chair of CC9 Social Systems and, since 2015 she is the chair of the IFAC Road Map Task Force. Her main recent research interests include observer design, performance and robustness issues in nonlinear, hybrid, networked and distributed control systems. She is the prizewinner of the 2008 Michel Monpetit prize of the French Academy of Science.  In 2016, she was nominated Chevalier de la Légion d’honneur from Government of France.

History of Automatic Control

Wednesday 12 July, 12:15-13:15, St Exupéry Auditorium

Chairperson: Luc Dugard

Abstract: Some historical aspects of Automatic Control will be briefly presented by six panel members who will develop different points such that Maxwell as a precursor of system identification and control science, the impact of results by Lyapunov to the development of control theory, system identification for control, evolutions in discrete event systems and manufacturing systems, control influence on aeronautics and aerospace. The presentation will be followed by discussions with the audience. 

Panel members:

  • Sergio Bittanti
    The celebrated paper ‘On Governors’, published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of London in 1869, is one of the first contributions to the analytical study of feedback systems. The author, James Clerk Maxwell (1831, 1879), is therefore hailed as one of the early control scholars. However, during the final years of his studies at Cambridge University, Maxwell made another equally important system theoretic contribution: his essay entitled ‘On the stability of motion of Saturn’s rings’ (1859). In this essay, he adopted a peculiar approach to the comprehension of the nature of the rings, which anticipated today’s techniques of model identification.
    Sergio Bittanti is a professor at the Politecnico di Milano, Italy. His research interest is in system identification and control. He served IFAC in various capacities, in particular as a member of the Council in the triennium 2002–2005, the triennium during which IFAC decided to assign to Italy the World Congress in 2011. In the triennium 2014-2017, he has been called again to be part of the Council, as Chairman of the IFAC Executive Board. He was bestowed with the Medal of the President of the Italian Republic Giorgio Napolitano for his leading contribution to the organization of the 18th IFAC World Congress in Milano. Sergio is a Fellow of IEEE and IFAC, and was the Editor-in-Chief of the European Journal of Control for 11 years.
  • Lennart Ljung
    The area of System Identification is as old as IFAC, and IFAC has played an important role in building up the area, primarily through the long running series of IFAC Symposia. The area has developed along two main routes, both originating in the 1960's: The statistical Maximum Likelihood/Prediction error approach and the system oriented realization approach. The relevance of identification to control applications has been an important focus, both in terms of model structures and experiment design.
    Lennart Ljung has been a professor at Linköping University since 1976. He has worked primarily with problems in System Identification and has written several books in that area. His group in Linköping has produced more than 85 PhDs and is now very active in sensor fusion and autonomy. Lennart Ljung has received several awards, among them the Quazza and Nichols Medals from IFAC.
  • Pavel Pakshin
    Impact of Results by Lyapunov to the Development of Control Theory. It is impossible to imagine modern control theory without such notions as "Lyapunov stability", "Lyapunov function" or "Lyapunov exponent". The significance of the Lyapunov function method in development of the control theory is discussed. A deep connection between Lyapunov function and other universal functions such as Bellman function in optimal control theory and storage function in dissipativity theory is indicated. The role of the Lyapunov equations and inequalities in the problem of control design, based on modern linear matrix inequalities (LMI) technique, is also discussed. Some difficult and unsolved problems are noted.
    Professor Pavel Pakshin received the Diploma in Electrical Engineering (ME) degree in 1974, and the Candidate of Sciences (PhD) degree in 1979, both from the Moscow Aviation Institute. In 1992, he received the Doctor of Physics and Mathematics degree from the Institute for Systems Studies of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow. Since 1998, he is the Head of Department of Applied Mathematics in the Arzamas Polytechnic Institute of R.E. Alekseev Nizhny Novgorod State Technical University. His current research interests are in the field of stability theory, robust control, stochastic control, multidimensional (nD) systems, new technologies in control education and control history.
  • Manuel Silva Suarez
    Discrete Event Systems (DES) starts to develop according to several partially disjoint but complementary threads, all of them dealing for a long while with the modeling, analysis and synthesis of human-made systems. For example, manufacturing, transportation or communication systems.  Furthermore, applications to population dynamics, epidemiology or biochemistry, for example, are becoming of increased importance. Roughly speaking, DES theory and engineering was constituted at the confluence of Automatic Control, Computer Science & Engineering, and Operations Research.
    Manuel Silva received the Industrial-Chemical Engineering degree from the University of Seville (1974) and the postgraduate (1975) and Ph.D. (1978) degrees in Automatic Control from the INP de Grenoble. From 1975 to 1978, he worked for the CNRS at the Laboratoire d’Automatique de Grenoble. In 1978 he started the group of Systems Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Zaragoza, where is full professor since 1981. Founding Member of the Spanish Association of Robotics, his main research interests include modeling, validation, performance evaluation, and control and implementation of distributed concurrent systems using Petri Nets. Among his books, he has authored Las Redes de Petri en la Automática y la Informática (AC, 1985; also Thomson-AC, 2002), coauthored Practice of Petri Nets in Manufacturing (Chapman & Hall, 1993), and coedited and coauthored Control of Discrete-Event Systems: Automata and Petri-Net Perspectives (Springer, 2013). Editor of Técnica e Ingeniería en España (in Spanish; 9 volumes), it is an historical, epistemological and sociological encyclopedia placing technology and engineering in a broad cultural framework. Prof. Silva has been distinguished with a medal from the city of Lille (France) and by the Association of Telecommunication Engineers of Aragón. He is Honoris Causa Doctorate by the University of Reims-Champagne-Ardennes, member of the Royal Academy of Engineering of Spain (2000), and of the Royal Academy of Exact, Physical, Chemical and Natural Sciences of Zaragoza (2014).
  • Gérard  Morel
    Manufacturing Automation faced the challenging Factory of the Future over the forty past years characterizing two complementary goals relating to large-scale system-of-systems control, resulting in the well-known centralized/hierarchical architecture of Computer Integrated Manufacturing and to some promising distributed/heterarchical architecture for Intelligent Manufacturing Systems.
    Gérard Morel is Professor Emeritus with the end of his career since 1975 as full professor at the University of Lorraine and researcher at CRAN, the Research Centre for Automatic Control of Nancy which is an associate unit of the CNRS (National Centre for Scientific Research). He directed about 30 PhD Thesis and Accreditations to Supervise Research and published over 150 articles in the area of Systems and Automation Engineering. He held scientific positions in national and international networks of research and served in several positions in IFAC as well as journal editor (Real-Time Automation on Engineering Applications of Artificial Intelligence & International Journal of Intelligent Manufacturing). He also held assessor positions for the European Commission and for the French Agency for the Evaluation of Research and Higher Education. He served as vice-chairman of AFIS, the French chapter of the International Council on Systems Engineering, and founded a master degree on Complex Systems Engineering. He is devoting a part of his retirement time to formalize and to pass the knowledge gained in systems thinking and engineering for Research as well as for Education issues.
  • Daniel Alazard
    Aerospace engineering has been always a key application field to illustrate the historical developments and major contributions from automatic control theory. The Kalman filter for aerospace vehicles state estimation or Pontryagin's minimum principle for optimal guidance are well-known examples. From the automatic control viewpoint, a specific feature of Aerospace applications is the use of knowledge-model based approaches rather than "black-box" approaches.  Since control algorithms available today support increasingly complex and detailed models, the trend today is to include the models of various subsystems in the design model in order to optimize the overall performance of the system. This was confirmed very recently with the increasing activity on UAVs: the systemic approach becomes more and more multi-disciplinary.
    Daniel Alazard received the Engineer’s degree from the Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Arts et Métiers in 1986 (golden medal) and the Master in Advanced Automatic Control and Systems from SUPAERO in 1987. Between 1989 and 2000, he is a research scientist at ONERA (The French Aerospace Lab). Since 2000, he is a Full Professor at ISAE-SUPAERO. He passed the Accreditation to Supervise Research in 2003. His main research interests concern robust control, multi-body system dynamics, flexible structure control and their applications to various aerospace systems. With 20 supervised PhDs and author of the monograph Reverse Engineering in Control Design (Wiley, 2013), he is also associate fellow of the AIAA (America Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics).
  • Luc Dugard
    Luc Dugard has been, since 1977, with the Control Systems Dept of GIPSA-lab (formerly LAG), (CNRS, Grenoble INP and Univ. Grenoble-Alpes). Luc Dugard presently works as a CNRS Senior Researcher (Directeur de Recherche). He was vice-head (1991-1998) and head (1999-2002) of the LAG, then part time working at the Ministry of Higher Education and Research (2003-2007) and at the HCERES (AERES Research and Higher Education Assessment Agency) as a scientific advisor (2007-2015). He published more than 400 papers in international journals, books and conferences on various theoretical and methodological domains of automatic control. He advised/co-advised 38 PhD students. He chaired the TC “Linear Control Systems” of the IFAC (2005-2011).

Your Research Sharing through Outreach

Wednesday 12 July, 13:30-15:30, St Exupéry Auditorium

Chairperson: Bozenna Pasik-Duncan

Abstract:  To help researchers, in particular, young researchers focus on engaging more with the community by showcasing their scholarly activity in an accessible way. The event includes a presentation period for those who are engaged in outreach activities to share their work and discussion tables where attendees can meet presenters and experts to discuss their ideas for broader impacts/outreach activities. This session will serve as an excellent training for undergraduate and graduate students and for young scientists on how to prepare Plain Talks for a wide range of the public. Open to all IFAC Congress Delegates. Students and young scientists are strongly encouraged to attend this Session.

Agenda:

  • Bozenna Pasik-Duncan, Introduction:  Broader Impacts/Outreach:  Sharing Research in a Wide Variety of Communities & Settings
  • Presentations by Panelists:
    Iven MareelsManaging the World’s Water—A Systems Engineer’s Perspective
    Linda BushnellHow to Control a Balancing Robot
    Sebastian TrimpeIntelligent Machines:  A Self-Balancing Cube and Learning Robots
    Anthony Rossiter:  Effective Presentations to Communicate and Enthuse a Wider Audience
  • Interactive Discussion of Panelists with the Audience
  • The TB Liaison to Education Project: Collecting Plain Talks by IFAC Technical Committee Liaisons to Education—Discussion
  • Closing Remarks

Panel members:

  • Bozenna Pasik-Duncan received the Master's degree in Mathematics from the University of Warsaw in 1970, and the Ph.D. and D.Sc. (Habilitation) degrees from the Warsaw School of Economics in Poland in 1978 and 1986, respectively. At the University of Kansas (KU) she is a Professor of Mathematics, Courtesy Professor of both EECS & AE, and ITTC Investigator, Chancellors Club Teaching Professor, and member of the KU Women's Hall of Fame. She is a Fellow of IEEE, Fellow of IFAC, recipient of the IEEE Third Millennium Medal, and IEEE CSS Distinguished Member Award. She has served in many capacities in several societies including IEEE CSS Vice President, three term IEEE CSS BoG member, and two term Program Director of SIAM Activity Group on Systems Theory and Control. Her current service includes Deputy Chair of the CSS TC on Control Education, Chair of the AACC Education Committee, a member of the IFAC TB as the Education Liaison, Chair of IEEE WIE Committee, a member of the IEEE CSS BoG and SSIT BoG, and a member of the SIAM Activity Group on Systems Theory and Control Conference Steering Committee. She is founder of Women in Control (WIC) and  first chair of IEEE CSS Standing Committee on WIC. At KU she is founder and faculty advisor of student chapters of AWM and SIAM, founder and coordinator of the Outreach Program, and founder and chair of Stochastic Adaptive Control Seminar. Her research interests are primarily in stochastic systems & stochastic adaptive control and in STEM education. She is a recipient of many awards.
  • Iven Mareels obtained the (ir) Masters of Electromechanical Engineering from Gent University Belgium in 1982 and the PhD in Systems Engineering from the Australian National University, Canberra, Australia in 1987. Since 1996, he is a Professor of Electrical and Electronic Engineering in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Melbourne. In June 2007, he became Dean of the Melbourne School of Engineering. He has extensive experience in consulting for both industry and government. He has strong interests in education. He was one of the developers of the Bachelor of Engineering at the Australian National University and one of the architects of the new 3+2 Master of Engineering education at Melbourne. His research interests are in large scale systems, which he studies using techniques from nonlinear control theory and dynamical systems theory, as well as adaptive and learning control methods. At present his research is focused on the modelling and control of water distribution systems, the electrical grid and the brain (in particular the epileptic brain). Mareels has published widely, one general book about systems engineering, four research monographs, in excess of 130 journal publications and 250 conference publications. He is also co-inventor of a family of 23 international patents related to autonomous water distribution systems. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering, Australia, a Fellow of the IEEE (USA), a Fellow of the Institute of Engineers Australia, and a Foreign Fellow of the Royal Flemish Academy of Belgium for Science and the Arts.  He has received numerous awards for his research and teaching. In 2013 Mareels, was named a Commander in the Order of the Crown of Belgium and he received the Centenary Medal.
  • Linda Bushnell is a Research Associate Professor in the Electrical Engineering Department of the University of Washington. She received her Ph.D. in EE from UC Berkeley in 1994, her M.A. in Mathematics from UC Berkeley in 1989, her M.S. in EE from UConn (Storrs, CT) in 1987, and her B.S. in EE from UConn (Storrs, CT) in 1985. She also received her MBA from the University of Washington Foster School of Business in 2010. Her research interests include networked control systems and secure-control. She is a recipient of the US Army Superior Civilian Service Award, NSF ADVANCE Fellowship, and IEEE Control Systems Society (CSS) Recognition Award. She is a Fellow of the IEEE. She is a member of IEEE, IEEE CSS and IEEE WIE. For IEEE CSS, she has served in many capacities including as a member of the Board of Governors (BoG), Distinguished Lecturer, Chair of Women in Control Standing Committee, member of TC Control Education, Liaison to IEEE WIE, CSS Secretary-Administrator and member of the Executive Committee, and member of BoG. For the American Automatic Control Council (AACC), she is the Treasurer of AACC and a member of the TC on Control Education. She has served ACC in several other capacities as a chair or vice-chair. For the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), she was the General Co-Chair for the Technical Program, Co-Chair for the Conference on High Confidence Networked Systems (HiCoNS) at CPSWeek 2014 and Technical Program Co-Chair for HiCoNS at CPSWeek 2013. She has been a member of multiple Technical Program Committees for the CDC, ACC, HiCoNS, and ISIC conferences.
  • J A Rossiter is well known as a researcher in predictive control over the last twenty-five years who has made seminal contributions in the areas of stability, feasibility and performance. Many ideas first proposed by him and co-workers are now taken as the norm within the research community. He is a keen educationalist and has received a number of teaching prizes and sees one of his key roles to help promote good understanding of predictive control within the general control community. Consequently, he is an author of a popular text book on predictive control (CRC Press 2003) which has received excellent reviews for its focus on understanding and insight. In more recent years he has supplemented this with a number of Youtube videos which also are very widely viewed and appreciated. He received his doctorate from the University of Oxford in 1990 and is currently a Reader at the University of Sheffield. He is the incoming chair (2017-2020) of the IFAC committee on Control Education
  • Sebastian Trimpe is a Research Group Leader at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Tübingen, Germany, where he leads the Intelligent Control Systems group. Sebastian obtained his Ph.D. degree in 2013 from ETH Zurich with Raffaello D’Andrea at the Institute for Dynamic Systems and Control. Before, he received a B.Sc. degree in General Engineering Science in 2005, a M.Sc. degree (Dipl.-Ing.) in Electrical Engineering in 2007, and an MBA degree in Technology Management in 2007, all from Hamburg University of Technology. In 2007, he was a research scholar at the University of California at Berkeley. Sebastian’s research interests are in the area of control systems theory and design with emphasis on networked and learning systems. Sebastian is recipient of the triennial IFAC World Congress Interactive Paper Prize (2011) and the Klaus Tschira Award for achievements in public understanding of science (2014).

How to Enhance Industry/University Collaboration on Advanced Control

Thursday 13 July, 10:00-12:00, St Exupéry Auditorium

Chairpersons: Silvia Mastellone & Alex van Delft

Abstract: For advanced control to deliver more benefit to industry and to better take advantage of recent developments in research, it is essential that the linkages between industry and academia be improved. The participants in this panel come from around the world and have substantial experiences, successful and otherwise, with such collaborations. Panelists will review different models for industry/university collaboration, present success stories and lessons learnt, and discuss considerations related to geographies, industry sectors, and government support for industry/academic research. Industry sectors represented include: process control, aerospace, food and beverage, mechatronics, and energy systems.

This is the first of two sessions organized by the IFAC (Pilot) Industry Committee for World Congress participants. These sessions are intended to help fulfill IFAC’s and the control community’s objectives for increasing understanding of industry needs among the research community, facilitating industry/ academic collaboration, and furthering the impact of advanced control for societal benefit.

Agenda:

  • Introductions
  • Overview of IFAC Industry Committee and review of activities in the triennium
  • Perspective statements from session chairs and panelists
  • Moderated discussion among panelists
  • Questions and answers with the audience
  • Closing remarks, including preview of the Industry Committee session on July 14

Panel members:

  • Silvia Mastellone is Professor for Control and Signal Processing at the University of Applied Science Northwestern Switzerland (FHNW). She obtained her Ph.D. degree in Systems and Entrepreneurial Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2008. From 2008 to 2016 she was Principal Scientist at ABB Corporate Research Center in Baden, Switzerland, where she led research projects in the area of advanced control for energy systems. She was a visiting researcher at the Institute of Automation, ETH Zurich, and the Xerox Park Innovation Group. Her research interests include decentralized control and estimation and networked control systems, with applications in power electronics converters, traction systems, renewables and electric bus systems. She is a member of the IFAC (Pilot) Industry Committee.

  • Alex van Delftjoined DSM in 1989 and has had several positions in Manufacturing, Engineering and (Program) Management before joining Corporate Operations in 2005. He has wide experience in operations and process control improvement projects and has initiated process control opportunity assessments and managed projects in the field. He was also program manager for the reorganization of DSM’s central engineering department. Currently he is responsible for global process control in DSM and heads a group of senior consultants. He serves as Chairman of the Executive Board of the Dutch/Belgian Process Control End Users’ Association. Dr. van Delft received his M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in Applied Physics from the Eindhoven University of Technology. He is a member of the Executive Committee of the IFAC (Pilot) Industry Committee.

  • Kevin Brooks obtained his B.Sc (Chemical Engineering) in 1980 and his Ph.D. in 1986, both from the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits) in Johannesburg South Africa.  He was a lecturer at Wits until 1990. He joined Honeywell Hi-Spec Solutions in 1995 and was appointed Engineering Leader for Advanced Process Control in 2003. In 2007 Kevin joined BluESP, the Aspentech distributor for South Africa, where he is now chief engineer.  He has performed projects in ethylene, fuel gas network optimization and novel applications in the mining industry.  He was president of the South African Council for Automation and Control (SACAC) for two years, a period which included the hosting of the 2014 IFAC World Congress in Cape Town. He is a member of the IFAC (Pilot) Industry Committee.

  • Sebastian Engell graduated in Electrical Engineering from Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany in 1978 and obtained his PhD and venia legendi in Automatic Control from Universität Duisburg in 1981 and 1987. In 1990 he became Full Professor of Process Dynamics and Operations at TU Dortmund. In 2008 he was a Distinguished Visiting Professor at Carnegie Mellon University, USA. He served as Vice-Rector for Research and International Relations of TUDO and has since played a leading role in the development of international collaborations at the university. He has received several awards for his scientific work, including an ERC Advanced Investigator Grant, the Joseph von Fraunhofer-Prize for Applied Research and a Journal of Process Control Best Survey Paper Award. He is a Fellow of IFAC and serves on the IFAC (Pilot) Industry Committee.

  • Thomas Jones is the Chief Executive Officer and co-founder of S-Plane Automation and an Extraordinary Professor at Stellenbosch University. He started his career as a joint appointment at the South African CSIR and Stellenbosch University. He then managed the Charles Stark Draper & MIT Technology Development Partnership Programme while completing his PhD at MIT. Later, as professor and Head of Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering he managed the largest industry-academia collaboration activity at Stellenbosch University.  In 2008 he co-founded S-Plane Automation, now employing 35 engineers and specializing in the development of high-end aircraft avionics and automation sub-systems. Prof. Jones is a member of the IFAC Technical Committee on Aerospace and the IFAC (Pilot) Industry Committee and an Associate Editor of Control Engineering Practice.

  • Michael Lees works for Carlton & United Breweries (a subsidiary of ABInBev) and has over 19 years of experience in the brewing industry. He is currently the Process Control and Automation Manager at the Carlton & United Breweries plant at Yatala, Queensland, Australia. He is responsible for the real-time automation and information systems used to operate the plant. He completed his PhD at the University of Melbourne’s Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering in 2011. He is an Honorary Senior Fellow at The University of Melbourne and continues to undertake research in areas including industrial informatics, green manufacturing, sustainability, production research, automation, industrial control systems and real-time information systems. He is a member of the IFAC (Pilot) Industry Committee.

  • Takashi Yamaguchi received M.S. and Dr. Eng. degrees from Tokyo Institute of Technology in 1981 and 1998, respectively. He joined the Mechanical Engineering Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd. in 1981. From 1986 to 1987, he was an industrial visiting researcher at the University of California, Berkeley. In 2008 he joined Ricoh Ltd. and has been developing mechatronics-related technology for printers and other office devices. He is now a corporate advisor. He has received engineering awards from the Society of Instrument and Control Engineers (SICE) and the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers and also a book award from SICE. He is a fellow of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers and a senior member of the Institute of Electrical Engineers of Japan. His publications include one authored and three edited books. He serves on the IFAC (Pilot) Industry Committee.


Automated Vehicles and Safety

Thursday 13 July, 11:30-13:30, l'Orangerie, Le Manoir du Prince

Organized by MOVEO

Chairperson: Gérard Yahiaoui

Abstract: We have to find new solutions to optimize the use of individual vehicle, based on various criteria whose main objective is to improve road safety. In this context, driving automation seems to be a holistic response to this issue. This concept is not new and various studies and projects have shown benefits automation could bring in terms of road safety and mobility enhancement. In the coming years, a key focus will need to be on the complementarity between driving automation, infrastructure, users and their interactions.
On the technological side, this involves a greater mastery of sciences and technologies related to vehicle’s environment perception, data fusion, communications V2V and V2I, operational security, decision making autonomy, etc. In human terms, it is essential to prepare the arrival of autonomous vehicle by working on simple exchanges and interactions between vehicle and driver and other road users, to avoid incomprehension on automation’s levels and to foster the gradual introduction of automated cars. This approach must be completed by the conditions of acceptance of drivers and other users. During this panel, experts in the field of automation’s technologies for safety and human-centered will exchange views to understand how will be possible the development of autonomous vehicles with safety and for safety.

Panel members:

  • Gérard Yahiaoui is CEO of the SME Nexyad. Nexyad offers four plug-ins for the connected and automated vehicle and for ADAS : road detection, obstacle detection, weather detection, to improve the safety of road users. Gérard Yahiaoui is also a scientific board member of PhD School MIIS, vice-president of Mov’eo cluster and board member of VEDECOM. In the past, he used to teach machine learning at ESME Sudria School. He has a wide range of scientific publications.
  • Anne Guillaume has been the director of LAB Renault – PSA Peugeot Citroën (Laboratory of Accidentology and Biomechanics) for seven years. The LAB’s activities are divided into two areas: accident research and biomechanics. Both are multidisciplinary, combining the study of human behaviour and technology. The LAB carries out both micro (in-depth accident investigations) and macro accident analysis in order to get epidemiological, etiological as well as clinical knowledge about the injuries and the accident mechanisms. Complementary approaches are supposed to provide the LAB with a comprehensive insight into the identification of relevant accident countermeasures and their function. Anne Guillaume is also pilot of the thematic « Road Users’s Safety » of the french cluster Mov’eo and member of the EUCAR « Safety » working group. Associate professor, doctor, Anne Guillaume directed two research teams in the French army until 2008, the auditory perception team and the biomechanics team.
  • Phillipe Chrétien is General Delegate of CEESAR (European Naturalistic Driving Study). For 25 years, this organization intends to improve road safety is divided into three research departments: accidentology, biomechanics and driver behaviour studies. CEESAR provides all scientific and ethics guarantees for these research requiring specific habilitations. CEESAR works with carmakers, automotive suppliers, public organizations and insurers and participate in various french, european and international research programs. Philippe Chrétien is also an technical expert for the « Road Users Safety » thematic in the French cluster Mov’eo and administrator for Mov’eo. In the past, he had several roles at PSA Group as International Quality Manager and recently as Quality Manager for electric and electronic systems.
  • Olivier Anselme is Automotive Sales Director at Oktal, one of the simulation and virtual reality’s world leader. Established in 1989, Oktal is the SOGECLAIR group’s simulation department since. Oktal is today a supplier of turnkey solutions for the biggest international main players for transport among which AIRBUS, RENAULT, PSA, VALEO, SNCF, KEOLIS, RATP, ALSTOM, and BOMBARDIER. Olivier Anselme is also an technical expert for the « Road Users Safety » thematic in the French cluster Mov’eo. He is holds a engineer bachelor ENSTA and had several functions in the oil industry before taking on new commercial responsabilities in various IT companies. He has been working at Oktal since 2002.

Control Challenges for Social Systems

Thursday 13 July, 12:15-13:15, Cassiopée St Exupéry Auditorium

Chairperson: Francoise Lamnabhi-Lagarrigue

Abstract: The challenges in Social Systems, that are intensifying years after years, are addressed by the IFAC Coordinating Committee CC9 ‘Social Systems’ and its five Technical Committees: TC 9.1. Economic, Business, and Financial Systems; TC 9.2. Social Impact of Automation; TC 9.3. Control for Smart Cities; TC 9.4. Control Education; TC 9.5. Technology, Culture and International Stability (TECIS). New domains of interest and new methodologies are emerging. This field exists at the crossroads of several disciplines where Control and Automation are playing a major, even critical, role. CC9 has undergone a re-organization in the last 6 years so as to meet these new control challenges. CC9 offers a room of a great potential of research and technical developments, which will have a great impact in our society. Moreover, because the technology is advancing in the light speed, this CC has also the important role of influencing our control community, to think deeper about the further purposes and consequences of our works. This Panel Discussion will first sketch the main objectives of its five IFAC Technical Committees, how they are organized and the main current methodologies. The second part of this Panel will consist of an open discussion with the attendees moderated by the current and the future CC9 chairs.

Agenda:

  • Introduction by F. Lamnabhi-Lagarrigue
  • TC9.1 - Economic, Business, and Financial Systems - scope and activities, by Philip Chen
  • TC9.2 - Social Impact of Automation - scope and activities by Wilfrid Perruquetti
  • TC9.3 - Control for Smart Cities - scope and activities by (Samuel) Qing-Shan Jia
  • TC9.4 - Control Education - scope and activities by Sebastián Dormido
  • TC9.5 - Technology, Culture and International Stability - scope and activities by Larry Stapleton
  • Open discussion moderated by F. Lamnabhi-Lagarrigue & Larry Stapleton

Panel members:

  • Francoise Lamnabhi-Lagarrigue, IFAC Fellow, is CNRS Senior Researcher since 1993 at the Laboratory of Signal and Systems, a Research Unit placed under the joint responsibility of CNRS, CentraleSupelec, University Paris-Sud and University Paris Saclay, France. She obtained the Master of Mathematics degree at the University Paul Sabatier (Toulouse) in 1976 and she held a CNRS researcher position in 1980. She received her Ph.D. and Docteur d'Etat degrees from the University Paris Sud in 1980 and 1985, respectively. Since 2001 she is Senior Editor of International Journal of Control and since 2015, Editor-in-Chief of Annual Reviews in Control. She was Scientific Manager of the European Marie Curie Control Training Site (2002-2006), of the European Network of Excellences HYCON (2005-2009) and HYCON2 (2010-2014). She is the founder of the European Embedded Control Institute (EECI) and the chair of the EECI International Graduate School on Control. Since 2011, she is serving as Member of the IFAC Technical Board as chair of CC9 Social Systems and, since 2015 she is the chair of the IFAC Road Map Task Force. Her main recent research interests include observer design, performance and robustness issues in nonlinear, hybrid, networked and distributed control systems. She is the prizewinner of the 2008 Michel Monpetit prize of the French Academy of Science.  In 2016, she was nominated Chevalier de la Légion d’honneur from Government of France.
  • C. L. Philip Chen. Dr. Chen is currently the Dean of the Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau, Macau, China and a Chair Professor of the Department of Computer and Information Science. He worked at U.S. for 23 years as a tenured professor, a department head and associate dean in two different universities. Dr. Chen’s research areas are systems, cybernetics and computational intelligence. He is a Fellow of the IEEE and AAAS. He was the President of IEEE Systems, Man, and Cybernetics Society (SMCS) (2012-2013). Currently, he is the Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics: Systems (2014-). He has been an Associate Editor of many IEEE Transactions, and currently he is an Associate Editor of IEEE Trans on Fuzzy Systems, IEEE Trans on Cybernetics, IEEE/CAA Automatica Sinica, and several IEEE Transactions. He is the Chair of TC 9.1 Economic and Business Systems of IFAC. He is also a Fellow of CAA and Fellow of HKIE and an Academician of International Academy of Systems and Cybernetics Science (IASCYS). In addition, he is an ABET (Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology Education, USA) Program Evaluator for Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Software Engineering programs. Dr. Chen received his M.S. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 1985 and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, in 1988, where he received Outstanding Electrical and Computer Engineering Award in 2016.
  • Wilfrid Perruquetti graduated from “Institut Industriel du Nord”, then joined “Centrale Lille” where he is Full Professor (since 2003). He belongs to CRIStAL (CNRS/ Centrale Lille) and to the Non-A project (INRIA Lille-Nord-Europe). His research activities started with developing notions of Lyapunov comparison systems then moved towards sliding modes technics (especially higher order) and  are actually devoted to non-asymptotic methods (in finite time) of estimation, control of complex systems using algebraic or geometric technics. He is deputy scientific director of INS2I CNRS (“Information and Communication Science & Technology Division” is one of the 10 institutes of the CNRS with about 54 labs, 11 000 people) and was from (2007 – 2009) scientific officer of the French Ministry of Education and Research (DGRI), (2010 – 2014) scientific project manager at ANR (French national research agency). He is or was member of several councils and IPC. He is currently member of several societies (IFAC, TC 1.3, 2.3 and 9.2 (Chairman), SEE member).
  • (Samuel) Qing-Shan Jia received the B.E. degree in automation in July 2002 and the Ph.D. degree in control science and engineering in July 2006, both from Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. He is an Associate Professor in the Center for Intelligent and Networked Systems (CFINS), Department of Automation, Tsinghua University. He was a visiting scholar at Harvard University in 2006, at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology in 2010, and at Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems, Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2013. His research interest is to develop an integrated data-driven, statistical, and computational approach to find designs and decision-making policies, which have simple structures and guaranteed good performance. His work relies on strong collaborations with experts in manufacturing systems, energy systems, autonomous systems, and smart cities. He is an associate editor of IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, IEEE Transactions on Automation Science and Engineering, and Discrete Event Dynamic Systems – Theory and Applications. He served the Discrete Event Systems Technical Committee chair in IEEE Control Systems Society (2012-2015), and now serves the Control for Smart Cities Technical Committee chair in International Federation of Automatic Control (IFAC), the Smart Buildings Technical Committee co-chair in IEEE Robotics and Automation Society, and the Beijing Chapter Chair of IEEE Control Systems Society.
  • Sebastián Dormido received the B.S. degree in Physics from Complutense University of Madrid, Spain, in 1968, the Ph.D. degree in Physics from the University of the Basque Country, Bilbao, Spain, in 1971. In 1981, he was appointed Professor of Control Engineering at the  National Distance Education University (UNED), Madrid. He has served as Vicerrector of Research (1983-1985) in UNED and he is now emeritus profesor at UNED. His research interest are: Computer Control, Event Based Control, Modelling-Simulation and Control Education with emphasis on Remote and Virtual labs. He has authored or co-authored over 300 technical papers in international journals and conferences and has supervised 40 Ph.D. students. From 2001-2006 has been President of the Spanish Association of Automatic Control (CEA). In 2007 received a Doctor Honorary Degree from Universidad de Huelva, in 2008 the National Automatic Control prize from Spanish Automatic Control Committee and in 2013 received a Doctor Honorary Degree from Universidad de Almería. From 2014 is the Chair of the IFAC Technical Committee on Control Education (TC9.4) and from 2015 is the Chair of the IEEE CSS Technical Committee on Control Education. He has authored or coauthored over 300 technical papers in international journals and conferences, and has supervised over 35 Ph.D. theses. His scientific activities include control education, computer control of industrial processes, model-based predictive control, hybrid control, and web-based laboratories for distance education. From 2001 to 2006, he was the President of the Spanish Association of Automatic Control, CEA-IFAC. He has received the National Automatic Control Award from the IFAC Spanish Automatic Control Committee (CEA) and he was awarded Honorary degree from the University of Huelva and the University of Almería.
  • Larry Stapleton. Dr. Larry Stapleton is senior academic in human factors, advanced digital systems and systems science. Following 5 years as a manager in a large multinational, Dr. Stapleton has lectured at Waterford Institute of Technology for 29 years. During this time he has worked as an advisor to business development groups, Enterprise Ireland and other government agencies and national and European level transportation systems safety authorities and regulators. He has advised the European Commission and national governments both inside and outside the EU and is founder of “Knewfutures”, a consulting firm focusing upon the combined impact of human factors and advanced digital technologies in areas associated with control, safety and risk management. He holds international academic positions, regularly speaking at conferences overseas. He has published over one hundred academic publications from work with hundreds of companies and 20 government and international agency reports. He is currently a visiting Professor in advanced digital business systems and human factors in engineering at the Technical University of Vienna, University of Business and Technology in the Western Balkans and to the Institute of Banking at University College Dublin.

Advanced Control in Industry: The Path Forward

Friday 14 July, 13:30-15:30, St Exupéry Auditorium

Chairpersons: Tariq Samad and Kazuya Asano

Abstract: This session will take a broad view of advanced control in industry, covering application requirements, research horizons and priorities, hiring of engineers and scientists, differences among industry sectors and geographies, university collaborations, and involvement in professional activities and societies by industry staff. Industry sectors represented in the session include automotive, aerospace, metals, process control, microelectromechanical systems, and biomedical devices.

This is the second of two sessions organized by the IFAC (Pilot) Industry Committee for World Congress participants. These sessions are intended to help fulfill IFAC’s and the control community’s objectives for increasing understanding of industry needs among the research community, facilitating industry/academic collaboration, and furthering the impact of advanced control for societal benefit.

Agenda:

  • Introductions
  • Perspective statements from session chairs and panelists
  • Moderated discussion
  • Questions and answers with the audience
  • Plans for a permanent IFAC Industry Committee
  • Closing remarks

Panel members:

  • Kazuya Asanoreceived his B.S., M.S. and Dr.Eng. degrees from the University of Tokyo, Japan, in 1981, 1983 and 2001, respectively. He joined Kawasaki Steel Corporation in 1983. He was a visiting associate at the California Institute of Technology from 1993 to 1994, and an academic guest at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology from 1994 to 1995. He is currently a principal researcher at the Steel Research Laboratory of JFE Steel Corporation. He has been involved in R&D of control systems for various steel processes. He is a vice-chair of the Technical Committee on Mining, Mineral and Metal Processing of IFAC and serves on the Executive Committee of the IFAC (Pilot) Industry Committee.

  • Tariq Samad holds the Honeywell/W.R. Sweatt Chair at the Technological Leadership Institute, University of Minnesota. He was with Honeywell until 2016, retiring as Corporate Fellow and Global Innovation Leader.  His interests relate broadly to automation, intelligence, and autonomy for complex engineering systems. Dr. Samad was President of IEEE Control Systems Society in 2009 and of the American Automatic Control Council in 2014-15.  He is a Fellow of IEEE and IFAC. He is editor-in-chief of IEEE Press.  His publications include the Encyclopedia of Systems and Control (co-editor-in-chief, Springer, 2014) and The Impact of Control Technology reports (co-editor, IEEE CSS, 2008 and 2011). Dr. Samad holds a B.S. from Yale University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Carnegie Mellon University. He chairs the IFAC (Pilot) Industry Committee.

  • Philippe Goupil received the PhD degree in signal processing from the French Polytechnic National Institute, Toulouse, France. He currently works at the Airbus design office, where he has acquired a strong experience in flight control systems and is in charge of developing advanced fault detection & diagnosis and parameter estimation functions. He was the Airbus focal point in two recent EU projects: ADDSAFE and RECONFIGURE. He has 16 industrial international patents and more than 50 conference and journal articles. He has been the industrial supervisor of four PhD students. He is member of two IFAC Technical Committees and of the IFAC (Pilot) Industry Committee. He is coauthor of Fault Diagnosis and Fault Tolerant Control and Guidance for Aerospace Vehicles, published by Springer.

  • Benyamin Grosman received his B.Sc., M.Sc., and Ph.D. degrees in chemical engineering from Technion, Israel, in 1998, 2002, and 2008 respectively. From 2008 to 2010 he was a post-doctoral fellow at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a guest investigator at the Sansum Diabetes Research Institute involved in developing artificial pancreas algorithms. In 2010 he joined  Medtronic, where he is now a Senior Principal Scientist. He has been leading the closed-loop algorithm development of the Medtronic 670G hybrid closed-loop insulin pump system, from early feasibility to pivotal trials and full product. He has received several awards for his work at Medtronic. Dr. Grosman has a broad background in diabetes, process mathematical modeling, process control and clinical trials design and coordination. He serves on the IFAC (Pilot) Industry Committee.

  • Angeliki Pantazi received the Diploma and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Technology from the University of Patras, Greece. She joined IBM Research – Zurich, Switzerland in 2002 as a Ph.D. student and became a Research Staff Member in 2006. Her research interests include high-speed nanopositioning, control technologies for magnetic tape drive systems, emerging memory concepts such as phase-change memory, and neuromorphic technologies. She has more than 80 refereed articles and 40 granted and pending patents. Dr. Pantazi was named IBM Master Inventor in 2014. She was a co-recipient of the 2009 IEEE Control Systems Technology Award, the 2009 IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology Outstanding Paper Award, the 2011 IBM Pat Goldberg Memorial Best Paper Award, the 2014 IFAC Industrial Achievement Award, and the 2017 IBM Corporate Award.

  • Jaroslav Pekar is R&D Manager at Honeywell Automotive Software and has been with Honeywell since 2005. He holds a Ph.D. degree in Control Engineering from the Czech Technical University in Prague. Jaroslav is working on R&D and application projects related to optimal and advanced control systems design for a wide range of applications with a personal goal to transform innovative approaches to practical applications. He is focused on fast-sampled dynamical systems including automotive powertrain and industrial energy control. Current work covers model-based advanced control systems for internal combustion engines, including aftertreatment systems. Jaroslav has more than 30 technical publications and holds more than five patents. Jaroslav has received the IEEE Control Systems Technology Award in 2012 and two Honeywell Technical Achievement awards.

  • Ricardo S. Sánchez-Peña holds an electrical engineering degree from the University of Buenos Aires (UBA) and a Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology. He worked in several research institutions in Argentina and collaborated with NASA and with the German and Brazilian space agencies. He has been a professor at UBA and the Buenos Aires Institute of Technology (ITBA). He has also worked in universities in Spain and been a visiting professor in the USA and EU. He has consulted for companies in aerospace and energy applications. He leads the Artificial Pancreas project in Argentina and is the Director of the Research & Ph.D. Department of ITBA and a Principal Investigator of the National Research Council (CONICET). He is on the Executive Committee of the IFAC (Pilot) Industry Committee.